All About CAD Conversion

Converting Raster to Vector Graphics

Posted by Scott Shuppert on Thu, Dec 04, 2014 @ 05:29 PM

Converting raster to vector graphics

Raster graphics are the pictorial imaging graphics produced by most commercial cameras, scanners and drawing tablets. The images are comprised of arrays of small screen areas (lighted pixels) or printed dots. Each pixel or dot is associated with a value for tint and shade. High resolution raster files can produced high quality imagery and are easily transmitted through line by line transmission.

The raster graphics system is great for reproducing surfaces of color and texture, which makes the system work very well for photography. However, the system is not good for reproducing lines. The raster line is a series of pixels, really a narrow version of a surface. Raster graphics are not easily scalable. When a raster image is enlarged, the pixels comprising the image are either made larger or separated so that edges become jagged or pixilated.

Read More

Tags: Raster to Vector

Do You Need Raster to Vector Conversion?

Posted by Diane Mitol on Wed, Sep 10, 2014 @ 03:56 PM

Do You Need Raster to Vector Conversion?

Eight Questions to Ask

Those of us who are in the business of CAD conversion regularly use terms like raster to vector conversion, or the shortened form, R2V.  But it was brought to my attention last week, that if you’re not in the CAD conversion business, you might not even know what raster to vector conversion is, or why you might need it.  So, we’ve compiled a list of eight questions that you can ask to determine if you need raster to vector conversion. 

But, before we get to the eight questions, let’s define just what raster to vector conversion is:

Read More

Tags: Raster to Vector, Raster to Vector Conversion

Solving the Raster to Vector Conversion Dilemma

Posted by Diane Mitol on Mon, Aug 25, 2014 @ 09:45 PM

Solving the Raster to Vector Conversion Dilemma

Sooner or later, everyone who scans an engineering drawing or construction drawing will need to convert the scanned file to a CAD file – maybe AutoCAD, Revit, Solidworks, VectorWorks, or some other CAD program. Regardless of how experienced you may be in operating your CAD software, converting the scanned file to a CAD file can present a dilemma.

The reason for this dilemma is two-fold. First of all, many people don’t realize when they’re scanning the original drawing that they need to scan in a particular way if they plan to convert it to CAD later; and, even if they do scan properly, they don’t have the knowledge or experience to properly convert the drawing.

Read More

Tags: Raster to Vector, Raster to Vector Conversion

Raster to Vector Conversion Basics

Posted by Diane Mitol on Thu, Jun 26, 2014 @ 03:09 PM

Raster to Vector Conversion Basics

Before we can talk about converting raster to vector, we need to understand what each is. Starting at the very basic level…each describes a type of drawing or image. So, what exactly is a raster image and how does it differ from a vector image? And why do we need to convert raster to vector?

First let’s look at the graphic arts. Basically, a photograph is a raster image, while a line drawing is a vector image. A raster image is made of up pixels (dots), each a different color, arranged to display an image, while a vector image is made up of paths (lines), each with magnitude (length) and direction that can be described by a mathematical formula. Rasters cannot be described by a mathematical formula but can be described by a locus, or location (xy).

Read More

Tags: Raster to Vector, Raster to Vector Conversion

R2V – The Nuts and Bolts of Converting to CAD

Posted by Diane Mitol on Mon, Jan 13, 2014 @ 03:16 PM

R2V – The Nuts and Bolts of Converting to CAD

What do you do when you have a JPEG, BMP, TIFF, IMG, GEM, CIT, or GIF file that you need to bring into AutoCAD or some other CAD file?  The above referenced files are “raster” type files, while all CAD programs work with “Vector” files.  Vector files come in various formats, with some of the most common file extensions being EPS, PDF (which can contain raster and vector) and DXF.

Read More

Tags: Raster to Vector, r2v

Raster to Vector – Connecting the Dots (Literally)

Posted by Diane Mitol on Wed, Sep 25, 2013 @ 05:58 PM

Raster to Vector – Connecting the Dots (Literally)

When a blueprint, engineering drawing, or graphic design is scanned, the resulting digital file is a raster file.  In order to make changes to the drawing or design using a CAD program, such as AutoCAD, the raster file must be converted to a vector file.  Quite literally, this does require connecting the dots since a raster file is a collection of pixels.   A pixel is a physical point (or dot) in a raster image.  It is the smallest addressable element in a display device; so it is the smallest controllable element of a picture represented on the screen. The address of a pixel corresponds to its physical coordinates. LCD pixels are manufactured in a two-dimensional grid, and are often represented using dots or squares.  Pixels are what you see when you enlarge a low resolution image.

Read More

Tags: Raster to Vector

Raster to Vector – Converting Scanned Drawings

Posted by Diane Mitol on Thu, Jun 13, 2013 @ 12:50 PM

Raster to Vector – Converting Scanned Drawings

Raster to Vector conversion starts with a digital raster file that was created during the process of scanning.  Raster files are made up of pixels, while vector files are made up of lines.  Most often the types of drawings that are converted from raster to vector are large format engineering drawings, architectural drawings, mechanical drawings and blueprints of various sorts.  Raster to vector conversion can also be used in the graphic arts for converting logos and other line-representations that have been scanned.  For purposes of this article, however, we’re talking about large format drawings used in machine tooling, architecture, aeronautics, automobile design and other types of manufacturing and construction.

Read More

Tags: Raster to Vector

Raster to Vector Conversion for Building Renovation

Posted by Diane Mitol on Wed, Mar 06, 2013 @ 05:04 PM

Raster to Vector Conversion for Building Renovation

Old Paper Construction Drawings

I live in an older city, with many older buildings…all of them designed and built well before the “digital age. “  As the city undertakes a revitalization project, renovations to some of the older buildings will begin.   Architects, Engineers and Contractors who are hired to facilitate these renovations will likely be handed an old set of mylars, vellums or worse, blueprints to work from.   How will they get these old drawings into a digital format for use in a modern day CAD program?

Read More

Tags: Raster to Vector, Raster to Vector Conversion

Raster to Vector Conversion for CNC Machines

Posted by Diane Mitol on Tue, Dec 18, 2012 @ 05:14 PM

Raster to Vector Conversion for CNC Machines

What are CNC Machines?

CNC (Computer Numerical Control) machines are automated devices that are used to mill industrial components.  Most CNC machines are used industrially in manufacturing.  By using coded instructions and an internal computer, they enable factories to fabricate parts accurately and quickly without human intervention.   There are many different types of CNC machines, ranging from drills to plasma cutters that can be used to make a wide variety of parts.

Read More

Tags: Raster to Vector, Raster to Vector Conversion, Raster to Vector for CNC Machines

Raster to Vector – Getting Accurate Conversions

Posted by Diane Mitol on Tue, Dec 04, 2012 @ 02:54 PM

Raster to Vector – Getting Accurate Conversions

What accuracy can you expect from raster to vector conversion?

Like so many seemingly simple questions, the answer is actually somewhat complex, because there are so many factors that contribute to the accuracy of the final converted CAD drawing.  There is the accuracy of the method of conversion, coupled with the abilities of the person doing the conversion, as well as the accuracy of the original scanned drawing.  A slip up in any one of these areas can make for loss of accuracy, and the loss of accuracy can grow exponentially with each additional mis-step.

First of all, let’s define accuracy.

Read More

Tags: Raster to Vector